Author Topic: Memory is studied less and needed more.  (Read 4880 times)

Offline klind60

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Memory is studied less and needed more.
« on: 2013 04 10 - 05:15 »
Learning is taught and practiced from early childhood. Teachers give an assignment, tell students where to find the answers, test them to find out if they did their homework. Practicing on history, math, etc. forms mental habits that can last a lifetime. Once the process becomes clear we can learn anything from how to play checkers to brain surgery. But what about memory?

A good memory is a terrific asset. People who remember my name and can recall information at will seem intelligent, experienced and worth listening to. They are more likely to succeed in whatever they attempt. What courses are offered from early childhood on that subject? I can't think of one.

I am now older than most people and can report that memory doesn't improve with age. I don't know whether that's because it gets too cluttered or the foundation is cracking but like anything else valuable it requires some maintenance. Some systems teach associating mental images with the thing you wish to remember. That does seem to help and is probably worth the time and effort.

Has anybody found a particularly good system?

Ken     


Offline positive_guy

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Re: Memory is studied less and needed more.
« Reply #1 on: 2014 02 11 - 03:54 »
I don't know of any specific courses on memory. Probably because we're still 100% sure on how memories are formed. But there are some great techniques you can use to help improve your memory and recall.

The system you mention is called a 'linking system' I believe. But the problem with this is that if you forget one image or 'association' in your chain then the whole system breaks down.

Take a look at the Loci System - you may have seen this taken to the extreme in BBCs Sherlock. Referred to as Shelock's 'mind palace'. This is the Loci system taken to the extreme. In its most basic form the loci system involves attaching images to real life route you know extremely well. The images represent items which you need to remember and are placed in fixed locations you know you'll encounter along that route. I used to use this technique to wow some colleagues at work - shameless I know. But with some practice it does work. I'm sure a quick google will bring up an in depth explanation.

Offline Serene

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Re: Memory is studied less and needed more.
« Reply #2 on: 2014 02 17 - 17:54 »
Well from what I've been reading and learning from my own experiences with memory, I see that there's two default ways of how memories are stored. The first is the "familiar". We learn new information based on patterns. For example, we know that the sun will rise every morning because it is something that we observe every day. Our brain picks up speech patterns. We have a pretty good way of telling when people are lying to us, because they act differently than how they normally do.

The second is the "peculiar". We remember very bizarre situations. Someone is more likely to remember a particular day of commuting to work if they got into a terrible car accident (unless they got into many car accidents before!). If someone famous passed you by on the street and gave you a compliment, you're more likely to remember it than any other compliment someone ever gave you. These odd situations stick out to our brain.

From my experience, it's easier to commit things to memory when they follow some sort of pattern. Otherwise, I have to make individual bizarre images in my mind to remember things. Sometimes, you can even use a combination of both ideas.

I use both methods to learn Korean. The syllable 수 in Korean is related to water (it's a pattern). So I can remember words like 수박 (watermelon) or 수영 (swimming). One word I had trouble remember was 연습하다. Well, I knew that
하다 (ha-da) was used in a lot of words that meant "to do". 연습 (yeon-seub) means "practice". Well, what I did was imagine that I was practicing tennis and that I suddenly stretched and yawned because I was tired. Practicing tennis is yawnsome (sounds like 연습). So that is how I ended up remembering that 연습하다 meant "to practice".

Hope that helps! :) I'd love to learn more memorization techniques. I like how Paul Scheele says that it's not that our memory is flawed, but that we are just using it the inefficient methods. Our brains are more powerful than we realize. We just have to work with it.

Offline Awesome Minds

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Re: Memory is studied less and needed more.
« Reply #3 on: 2014 02 26 - 05:36 »
I look at memory in a slightly different way, yes it is useful to remember important things that will enhance your life, but I also think that we can hold onto to many memories and some of them cause conflict in our lives. Negative things that happen to us in our lives can influence our lives in a negative way without us even realising it, where as positive things that happen can have the opposite effect.

So we also need to know how to let go and forget negative things, and only hold onto and remember the positive things. Also I do not see the point of remembering all sorts of information that does not help you in your everyday life. If you decide to become a regular quiz goer then memory is good for that, but why would you want to hang onto information and facts unless you are using them regularly.

It is a good thing to be clear on what you want out of life, know where you are going, and learn and memorize the information for you to get where you want to go, other information that does not resonate with your goal is just sitting there taking up space. I prefer to forget information that I do not need, and if I need to know something that I have forgotten, it is easy in this day and age to find the answer quickly.

I meditate to clear my mind of all the noise and focus only on the things that I want to> I did say that I look at it in a slightly different way, but we are all different, which is a good thing. Interesting post and subject klind60 :)

Offline mspillman

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Re: Memory is studied less and needed more.
« Reply #4 on: 2014 10 03 - 14:05 »
A basic thought here:

One reason (I believe) that our memory seems to "fade" as we get older is simply due to the fact that we do not "exercise" our brain/memory in a way that would help.

Two thoughts:
     1. I know a guy that is in his 70's that told me he visited with his Doctor and mentioned how he would have a hard time remember things from time to time. He usually would eventually remember what it was but, it still bothered him that it took so long. The Doctor told him that, many times, it's simply due to the fact that LIFE-LONG MEMORIES have been stored in our mind and, just like a room full of files, sometimes it just takes a little longer to find that particular "memory file".
     2. The other day I stopped by and visited my 84 year old Mother. She was working on a crossword puzzle which, for as long as I can remember, she has done those as well as other "mind-game" activities. I don't know what it has done for her memory but, I would venture a guess that it has helped keep it "healthier".

Sure, there are some diseases that we cannot control but, I don't think that is really what's being discussed in this thread.

As the saying goes, "Use it or Lose it!"

Whatever you do, be sure to...

"Make it an AWESOME day! (Who else is going to do it for you?)"
Mike


Offline AspiringGreatness

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Re: Memory is studied less and needed more.
« Reply #5 on: 2015 05 29 - 13:21 »
A basic thought here:

One reason (I believe) that our memory seems to "fade" as we get older is simply due to the fact that we do not "exercise" our brain/memory in a way that would help.

Two thoughts:
     1. I know a guy that is in his 70's that told me he visited with his Doctor and mentioned how he would have a hard time remember things from time to time. He usually would eventually remember what it was but, it still bothered him that it took so long. The Doctor told him that, many times, it's simply due to the fact that LIFE-LONG MEMORIES have been stored in our mind and, just like a room full of files, sometimes it just takes a little longer to find that particular "memory file".
     2. The other day I stopped by and visited my 84 year old Mother. She was working on a crossword puzzle which, for as long as I can remember, she has done those as well as other "mind-game" activities. I don't know what it has done for her memory but, I would venture a guess that it has helped keep it "healthier".

Sure, there are some diseases that we cannot control but, I don't think that is really what's being discussed in this thread.

As the saying goes, "Use it or Lose it!"

Whatever you do, be sure to...

"Make it an AWESOME day! (Who else is going to do it for you?)"
Mike


Very true, keep your body and mind active and it will remain in an optimal state. If you fall in an inactive and sluggish state your body and mind will began to shut down. Isaac Newton had the theory " A body in motion will stay in motion, a body at rest will stay at rest " Keep your mind and body learning, and staying active!